June 4, 2012

|

GoldSim Selected by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for Nuclear Reactor Safety Study

Issaquah, WA (USA) - June 4, 2012 – The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have selected GoldSim as the software platform for a long-term study of extremely low-probability rupture (xLPR) events for nuclear power plants.  As part of Phase 2 of the NRC/EPRI xLPR project a kickoff meeting was held at the GoldSim offices in Issaquah, WA where representatives from the NRC, Sandia National Laboratories and GoldSim met to plan enhancements to the GoldSim software to support a second generation model of these reactor risks.

The project will develop a high-performance simulation model that can be used to support regulatory decisions about the design and maintenance of reactors.  The model will use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate large numbers of possible histories as the components in a reactor age, including the effects of inspection and maintenance activities.  The key goal is to ensure that any slowly-developing defects in reactor systems are identified and rectified long before there is any serious risk to the reactor’s safety.  

The xLPR project is supported by a number of organizations with deep experience in the design and management of nuclear power plants, including the Oak Ridge and PNNL national laboratories, Areva, Battelle, Exelon, Westinghouse, and others.

About the GoldSim Technology Group

The GoldSim Technology Group is a privately held software company dedicated to delivering software and services to help organizations understand complex systems and make better decisions. GoldSim software is used by over 400 organizations worldwide to support risk management, strategic planning, and policy analysis in many industries, including waste management, mining, energy, manufacturing, aerospace and defense.

CONTACT:
Rick Kossik
Principal
GoldSim Technology Group
E-mail: rkossik@goldsim.com
Phone: 425-295-6985
Fax: 425-642-8073
www.goldsim.com


 

Making Better Decisions In An Uncertain World